St. Patrick's Cathedral, Ireland - Tracy McCrackin Photography
St. Patrick's Cathedral, Ireland - Tracy McCrackin Photography
St. Patrick's Cathedral, Ireland - Tracy McCrackin Photography

St. Patrick's Cathedral, Ireland

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$25.00
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The present St. Patrick's Cathedral building dates from 1220-1259 . It was constructed on the site of an ancient well (which was supposed to have been used by St. Patrick himself). The building replaced an earlier wooden church. 

Archbishop John Comyn was responsible for elevating Saint Patrick’s to Cathedral status, but the credit for its construction should have really gone to Archbishop Luke who held the position from 1219-1260.  He was blind by the time the work was complete, so he never saw the full fruits of his efforts. 

Luke built a Gothic cathedral in a cruciform shape; with the main body of the church known as the Nave resembling the long part of a cross, the top of the cross known as the Choir, with the arms of the cross known as the Transepts. The building evolved over the course of the next 700 years. In 1270 the Lady Chapel was added. 

After the English Reformation Saint Patrick’s became an Anglican Cathedral and modifications were made to its interior to suit new theological changes. Many statues were removed from alcoves and rich decoration was stripped from ceilings such as the Lady Chapel. 

Rising tall, the cathedral tower (Minot's Tower) has had a tumultuous history and has had many incarnations. The original spire of the Cathedral was blown down in a storm in 1316. The following year the Cathedral was set on fire during the Bruce Wars and many precious objects were looted.  In 1362 repairs were made to the Cathedral.

This image was taken of "St. Patrick's Cathedral" during the spring, and offers up neutral hues of green, yellow and blue.  Satisfy your wanderlust by purchasing this for your living space.  Your image will be printed using high-quality papers with a high color accuracy, which guarantees that your prints will last a lifetime without fading.